Midway (2019) Full Movie

Midway
7.1/10 by 1124 users

Midway (2019) : The story of the Battle of Midway, and the leaders and soldiers who used their instincts, fortitude and bravery to overcome massive odds.

Title Midway (2019)
Release Date Nov 06, 2019
Genres , , ,
Production Company AGC Studios, Centropolis Entertainment, Entertainment One, RuYi Media, Starlight Culture Entertainment Group, Street Entertainment, The Mark Gordon Company
Production Countries United States of America
Casts Ed Skrein, Patrick Wilson, Woody Harrelson, Luke Evans, Mandy Moore, Luke Kleintank, Dennis Quaid, Aaron Eckhart, Keean Johnson, Nick Jonas, Etsushi Toyokawa
Plot Keywords world war ii, war, battle of midway, pacific theater, 1940s
Lieutenant Richard 'Dick' Best
Lieutenant Richard 'Dick' Best
Ed Skrein
Rear Admiral Edwin T. Layton
Rear Admiral Edwin T. Layton
Patrick Wilson
Admiral Chester W. Nimitz
Admiral Chester W. Nimitz
Woody Harrelson
Commander Wade McClusky
Commander Wade McClusky
Luke Evans
Anne Best
Anne Best
Mandy Moore
Lieutenant Clarence Earle Dickinson
Lieutenant Clarence Earle Dickinson
Luke Kleintank
Vice Admiral William 'Bull' Halsey
Vice Admiral William 'Bull' Halsey
Dennis Quaid
Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle
Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle
Aaron Eckhart
Chief Aviation Radioman James Murray
Chief Aviation Radioman James Murray
Keean Johnson
Bruno Gaido
Bruno Gaido
Nick Jonas
Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto
Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto
Etsushi Toyokawa
Rear Admiral Tamon Yamaguchi
Rear Admiral Tamon Yamaguchi
Tadanobu Asano
Commander Eugene Lindsey
Commander Eugene Lindsey
Darren Criss
George 'Tex' Gay
George 'Tex' Gay
Brandon Sklenar
Willie West
Willie West
Jake Manley
Vice Admiral Chūichi Nagumo
Vice Admiral Chūichi Nagumo
Jun Kunimura
Captain Tomeo Kaku
Captain Tomeo Kaku
Nobuya Shimamoto
Commander Joseph Rochefort
Commander Joseph Rochefort
Brennan Brown
Rear Admiral Raymond Spruance
Rear Admiral Raymond Spruance
Jake Weber
Lieutenant Roy Pearce
Lieutenant Roy Pearce
Alexander Ludwig
Husband Kimmel
Husband Kimmel
David Hewlett
Ernest King
Ernest King
Mark Rolston
Captain Miles Browning
Captain Miles Browning
Eric Davis
Zhu Xuesan
Zhu Xuesan
Kenny Leu
Dagne Layton
Dagne Layton
Rachael Perrell Fosket
Cmdr. Minoru Genda
Cmdr. Minoru Genda
Peter Shinkoda
William Brockman
William Brockman
James Carpinello
Captain Rawlings
Captain Rawlings
Tim Beckmann
Marie Pearce
Marie Pearce
Sarah Halford
Sully Brown
Sully Brown
Cameron Brodeur
Prime Minister Tojo
Prime Minister Tojo
Hiromoto Ida
Emperor Hirohito
Emperor Hirohito
Hiroaki Shintani
Ensigh O’Flaherty
Ensigh O’Flaherty
Russell Dennis Lewis
John Ford
John Ford
Geoffrey Blake
Bill Miller
Bill Miller
Mikaël Conde
Barbara Best
Barbara Best
Madison Roukema
Millicent McClusky
Millicent McClusky
Christie Brooke
Paul Crosley
Paul Crosley
Dustin Geiger
Pat Rooney
Pat Rooney
Jason Lee Hoy
Admiral King Secretary
Admiral King Secretary
Ellen Dubin
Marine Captain (Midway)
Marine Captain (Midway)
Jason New
Jack MacKenzie Jr.
Jack MacKenzie Jr.
Dean Schaller
Hank Potter
Hank Potter
Jacob Blair
Geisha
Geisha
Kayo Yasuhara
Petty Officer (Pacific HQ)
Petty Officer (Pacific HQ)
Rudolph Wallstrom
Staff Officer (Nimitz)
Staff Officer (Nimitz)
Matthew MacCaull
Chinese Major
Chinese Major
Philip Fu-Kang Wang
Radioman #1 (Enterprise SC)
Radioman #1 (Enterprise SC)
Johan Strombergsson-Denora
Radioman #2 (Enterprise SC)
Radioman #2 (Enterprise SC)
Nico DeCastris
Radar Officer (Enterprise)
Radar Officer (Enterprise)
Alexandre Dubois
Radar Officer (Enterprise)
Radar Officer (Enterprise)
Tyler Elliot Burke
Lt. JG (Hospital)
Lt. JG (Hospital)
Raphael Grosz-Harvey
Talker
Talker
Trevor Danielson
Buzz Davis (Sonar Tech Nautilus)
Buzz Davis (Sonar Tech Nautilus)
Agostino Michael Cimino
Imperial Guardsman
Imperial Guardsman
Takeshi Kurokawa
Japanese Junior Officer (Yamat)
Japanese Junior Officer (Yamat)
Ryuta Kato
Japanese Officer (Prison)
Japanese Officer (Prison)
Garret Sato
Navy Yard Inspector
Navy Yard Inspector
Neil Girvan
Lofton Henderson
Lofton Henderson
Ellis Arch
McClusky's Radioman
McClusky's Radioman
Robert Crooks
Gay's Radioman
Gay's Radioman
Sean Colby
Signal Officer (Akagi)
Signal Officer (Akagi)
Kasey Ryne Mazak
Deck Officer (Akagi)
Deck Officer (Akagi)
Ryo Hayashida
Helmsman (Nautilus)
Helmsman (Nautilus)
Michael Chapman
Damage Control Officer
Damage Control Officer
Masahiro Tanikawa Masa Tani
Japanese Lieutenant (Kaga)
Japanese Lieutenant (Kaga)
Ryohei Arima
Makigumo Captain
Makigumo Captain
Hiro Kanagawa
Makigumo Lieutenant
Makigumo Lieutenant
Ken Takikawa
Passing Sailor
Passing Sailor
Leonardo Boudreau
SBD Pilot (Enterprise)
SBD Pilot (Enterprise)
Tony Christopher
Staff Officer (Yamato)
Staff Officer (Yamato)
Yuta Takenaka
Flag Officer (Yamato)
Flag Officer (Yamato)
Tatsuya Shirato
William 'Slim' Townsend
William 'Slim' Townsend
Tyler Hall
Smoking Sailor
Smoking Sailor
Kyle Bougeno
Breathless Ensign (Enterprise)
Breathless Ensign (Enterprise)
David Dacosta
Hiryu Helmsman
Hiryu Helmsman
Kazuki Gonzalez-Adachi
Torpedo Room Chief
Torpedo Room Chief
Reyn Halford
Japanese Boy (10 YO)
Japanese Boy (10 YO)
Toyoaki Ito Leung
Japanese Boy #2 (6 YO)
Japanese Boy #2 (6 YO)
Halta Nonen
Chief Medic (Enterprise)
Chief Medic (Enterprise)
Adrian Spencer
Edwin Kroeger
Edwin Kroeger
James Hicks
Petty Officer #2
Petty Officer #2
Sebastian Pigott
Yorktown Spotter
Yorktown Spotter
Simon Pelletier-Gilbert
Doolittle's Bombardier
Doolittle's Bombardier
Philippe Verville
Japanese Duck Netting Officer
Japanese Duck Netting Officer
Shigeru Yabuta
Zero Pilots Squadron Leader
Zero Pilots Squadron Leader
Seunghwan Min
Hiryu Pointer
Hiryu Pointer
Christopher Tapia
Hiryu Talker
Hiryu Talker
Sangwon Jun
Akagi Spotter
Akagi Spotter
Motoo Taira
Ballroom Singer
Ballroom Singer
Ana Maria Lombo

Reviews

  • msbreviews

    If you enjoy reading my Spoiler-Free reviews, please follow my blog :) With all due respect to Roland Emmerich and to his fantastic Independence Day, his movies never quite reach their potential, ending up in constant disappointments. It doesn't matter if he has excellent casts or amazing VFX teams, his films' screenplays are almost always stuffed with narrative issues. Midway is simply another installment in his saga of letdowns. Without knowing the director, anyone who looks at this movie will feel instantly captivated. From the unbelievably talented cast to the impressive visuals, it has two attention-grabber ingredients, which can result in a remarkable film… only if the two pillars of any cinematic production are decent enough: story and characters. These are the main issue with Emmerich's movies. His characters are not compelling or intriguing enough, and his screenplays lack creativity and excitement (whether these are written by him or someone else). When I noticed that Midway had such an acclaimed cast and that it was about the Battle of Midway, I immediately got excited. War epics are a genre that I sincerely appreciate. However, when I checked who was "running the show", I instantly lowered my expectations. Honestly, it's exactly what I expected it to be: visually gripping, but emotionally hollow. I don't want to understate it. The CGI work in this film is jaw-dropping. The actual war is riveting with astonishing aerial sequences and powerful sound design. Even at a regular screening with the usual 7.1 Dolby surround speakers, the floor was rumbling with the explosions and the planes. This is why I think audiences will definitely enjoy this movie. Maybe not a vast majority, but surely most people will leave their theaters feeling it was good entertainment. It has a long runtime, and it's hard to get through the exposition-heavy story, but in the end, I bet the general public will appreciate the war action enough to give the whole thing a thumbs up. Nevertheless, it's still a very superficial flick. While it's very respectful to everyone who fought in the war (including the Japanese) and to the historic event on itself, it lacks emotional attachment to its characters. Dunkirk was praised by both critics and audiences all around the world, but its main criticism connects to what I just wrote. Christopher Nolan's film also didn't have any compelling characters. However, there's a big difference between these two movies. Both their marketing and their ultimate goal are distinct. Dunkirk was all about showing the actual war. It never marketed itself as a character-study or that it would even have a significant focus on some of the heroes that fought there. Nolan repeated several times: it's about the war and the war only. It's genuinely one of the best, if not the best, *pure* war film I've ever seen. When it comes to depicting the claustrophobic, unbreathable, restless, bloody, loud event that a devastating war is, Dunkirk is so realistic it can even become uncomfortable with just sitting in your chair (at least, I did in IMAX). On the other hand, Midway's marketing was about paying homage to "people who fought in the Battle of Midway". Hence the stellar cast compared to Nolan's just competent actors (with obvious exceptions like Mark Rylance or Tom Hardy). It spends most of its screentime trying to develop the actual people that helped win that battle, not with the action itself. Therefore, these characters need engaging scripts and emotionally resonant arcs. Wes Tooke delivers a screenplay packed with so much exposition that a lot of it looks clearly unrealistic. Characters discuss specific topics that don't make any sense of being in a conversation at a particular time and place. Throughout the runtime, there are dialogue sequences with the sole purpose of explicitly telling the audience what we need to know to understand the story, which ends up turning the narrative confusing, convoluted, and lacking faster pacing. It's tough to get through the non-action periods, and I can't even imagine how dull it would be without such an impeccable cast. Ed Skrein remarkably portrays Dick Best, the only character who's genuinely compelling and carries a complete, well-developed arc. Unfortunately, I didn't feel invested in any other character. Only the best movies of every year can have a numerous and talented cast while giving each and every actor an exciting role. Midway has too many characters for the story it wants to tell. In addition to this, it has to stretch its runtime because you can't get Woody Harrelson or Dennis Quaid playing secondary roles and not giving them more than just a couple of lines. As time goes by, Emmerich's storytelling structure gets needlessly more and more complicated to follow. It's yet another film added to the "wasted potential" list… Potential due to how truly magnificent the action sequences can be. It's undeniable that these are entertaining, gripping, and exciting. The dive bombers' scenes are packed with so much tension that I was getting more and more frustrated every time they missed their target, and a bomb went into the sea. I wanted them to succeed so bad, and this feeling can only be triggered by something extraordinary. Midway's war is as close to epic as it could be, but as with every other cinematic production, if its story and its characters are not up to par with the action, there are no outstanding VFX that can save a lousy screenplay. All in all, Midway is a respectful homage to the people who fought in the Battle of Midway, but it fails to deliver an engaging story with compelling characters. With more characters that what it needed, the runtime is stretched beyond its limit due to the numerous acclaimed actors who would never be in a movie if they didn't have more than a couple of lines. Roland Emmerich has to thank his VFX team for presenting the closest war action we could ever get of the famous battle. Truly epic visuals with tense and riveting aerial sequences, plus a powerful sound design, get your teeth biting the nails. Unfortunately, except for Ed Skrein's character, I didn't feel invested enough to appreciate the non-action moments due to the confusing, convoluted, and exposition-heavy narrative. It's a shame that a visually impressive film possesses such an emotionally dull story. However, I still recommend it for anyone who enjoys war epics and "based on a true story" adaptations. PS: it doesn’t hurt to research a bit about the Battle of Midway. I didn’t and I’m sort of regretting that now. Don’t make the same mistake. Going in with basic knowledge of what, how, and why it happened will only help you enjoy this movie more. Rating: C+

  • Wuchak

    ***Just the facts, Jack*** Intelligence officer Edwin Layton (Patrick Wilson) warns that a Japanese attack is imminent, but his advice is disregarded and the Japanese use their carrier fleet to attack Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Admiral Chester Nimitz (Woody Harrelson) swiftly assumes command of the heavily weakened US Pacific Fleet. After the Doolittle air raid on Tokyo & Honshu 4.5 months later, events lead up to the Battle of Midway on June 4–7, 1942. Ed Skrein plays cocky pilot Dick Best while Dennis Quaid is on hand as carrier commander William "Bull" Halsey. "Midway" (2019) tackles the Battle of Midway and events leading up to it without throwing in a dramatic fictional story, like the love triangle of “Pearl Harbor” (2001). While I loved “Pearl Harbor” and proudly stand by it, “Midway” chooses to stick to the facts and is thrilling from beginning to end. The main cast members are all real-life figures and there’s a tribute to each at the close. This is superior to the 1976 movie because Roland Emmerich had the CGI technology to pull off the battle scenes which take place in & above the Pacific Ocean near the atoll of Midway, which is located a little over a thousand miles west of Hawaii. The flick successfully takes the viewer right into the midst of the fight on the water, in the air and under the water. It’s exciting, horrific and revelatory. The film runs almost 2 hours and 18 minutes. GRADE: A-

  • SWITCH.

    War stories are only worth retelling in film if you're doing something new and interesting with the genre. Otherwise, it's just a retread of 'Pearl Harbour' or 'Fury' or any of the dozen other thematically-empty, explosion-happy extravaganzas from the last ten years. There's a compelling, nuanced, and affecting film to be made about Midway. This is not that film. - Jake Watt Read Jake's full article... https://www.maketheswitch.com.au/article/review-midway-sound-and-fury-signifying-nothing

  • JPV852

    Admittedly I have a love for anything involving World War II and although the dialogue was a bit spotty and some of the visual effects were okay at best, I still found this to be a pretty good war movie and nice performances all around. Probably doesn't rank all that high compared to others about Midway and Pearl Harbor, yet still found it to be worth checking out. **3.75/5**

  • SierraKiloBravo

    Click here for a video version of this review: youtu.be/2Mr6XRF4GR4 _Midway_ is an ambitous film that sets out to follow the United States entry into World War Two, from the attack on Pearl Harbour through to the Battle of Midway. To tell this story it focuses on two main characters who are also based on real life people. There's Ed Skrein playing Dick Best, a pilot on the USS Enterprise, and Patrick Wilson playing intelligence officer Edwin Layton. As you might imagine jamming seven months of war into just over two hours is a big task, and while they did manage to pull this off, the result is a movie that feels rushed, where we can't get to know all the many characters, and which probably requires a pretty strong knowledge of this time period in history to understand all the things that are rapidly being thrown on screen. I actually had a lot of trouble telling who was who in many of the scenes involving the pilots. Apart from Ed Skrein and Luke Evans the rest of the pilots and rear gunners are such a copy / paste of each other and they come and go so fast on screen that you have zero time to have any kind of emotional connection to them, even though the movie tries to make you feel for them. For a lead actor, Skrein is very wooden and uninspiring, and I don't think has shoulders big enough to carry his part of the film. Then, as if the 10,000 mile an hour story is not bad enough, this movie relies very heavily on visual effects. Apart from close-ups, everything you see that involves a ship or a plane is entirely CGI and it is woefully bad 99% of the time. I've used the Playstation analogy a lot, and this is another example. I feel like if they had cut back the story to not cover so many fights and battles, there would have been a lot less visual effect shots. And with less shots to create and render, perhaps those remaining would have come out looking more realistic. As it is, it really takes you out of the movie - the planes move like they are weightless and defy the laws of physics, the explosions look they were made in AfterEffects, and each scene on a ship has that horrible green screen glow about it. In summary I think this movie suffers from trying to do too much all at once. This came off feeling more like a trilogy of movies about Pearl Harbour, The Doolittle Raid, and The Battle of Midway had been edited down to one single movie. The end result is a rushed film that is hard to follow, whose characters are difficult to connect with, and whose visual effects are video game level at best. This will not go down in history as a great war film.