Braveheart (1995) Full Movie

Braveheart
7.9/10 by 6793 users

Braveheart (1995) : Enraged at the slaughter of Murron, his new bride and childhood love, Scottish warrior William Wallace slays a platoon of the local English lord's soldiers. This leads the village to revolt and, eventually, the entire country to rise up against English rule.

Title Braveheart (1995)
Release Date May 24, 1995
Genres , , ,
Production Company Icon Entertainment International, The Ladd Company, B.H. Finance C.V.
Production Countries United States of America
Casts Mel Gibson, Catherine McCormack, Sophie Marceau, Patrick McGoohan, Angus Macfadyen, Brendan Gleeson, James Robinson, James Cosmo, Sean McGinley, Gerda Stevenson, Mhairi Calvey
Plot Keywords individual, scotland, in love with enemy, revolution, kilt, legend, independence, freedom, idealism, family clan, battle, united kingdom, revolt, tyranny, false history, highlands, 13th century, scottish highlands, warfield
William Wallace
William Wallace
Mel Gibson
Murron MacClannough
Murron MacClannough
Catherine McCormack
Princess Isabelle
Princess Isabelle
Sophie Marceau
King Edward
King Edward
Patrick McGoohan
Robert the Bruce
Robert the Bruce
Angus Macfadyen
Hamish Campbell
Hamish Campbell
Brendan Gleeson
Young William Wallace
Young William Wallace
James Robinson
Campbell
Campbell
James Cosmo
MacClannough
MacClannough
Sean McGinley
Mother MacClannough
Mother MacClannough
Gerda Stevenson
Young Murron MacClannough
Young Murron MacClannough
Mhairi Calvey
Nicolette
Nicolette
Jeanne Marine
Malcolm Wallace
Malcolm Wallace
Sean Lawlor
John Wallace
John Wallace
Sandy Nelson
Elder Stewart
Elder Stewart
Alan Tall
Young Hamish Campbell
Young Hamish Campbell
Andrew Weir
Argyle Wallace
Argyle Wallace
Brian Cox
Edward, Prince of Wales
Edward, Prince of Wales
Peter Hanly
Phillip
Phillip
Stephen Billington
Morrison
Morrison
Tommy Flanagan
Lord Bottoms
Lord Bottoms
Rupert Vansittart
MacGregor
MacGregor
Tam White
Robert Bruce Sr.
Robert Bruce Sr.
Ian Bannen
Stephen, Irish Fighter
Stephen, Irish Fighter
David O'Hara
Veteran
Veteran
Peter Mullan
Chief Justice/Executioner
Chief Justice/Executioner
David Gant
Magistrate
Magistrate
Malcolm Tierney
Lord Talmadge
Lord Talmadge
Martin Murphy
Cheltham
Cheltham
Gerard McSorley
Balliol
Balliol
Bernard Horsfall
Governor of York
Governor of York
Richard Leaf
Sean
Sean
Liam Carney
Priest No. 1
Priest No. 1
Ralph Riach
King's Advisor
King's Advisor
Barry McGovern
Craig
Craig
John Kavanagh
Mornay
Mornay
Alun Armstrong
Mrs. Morrison
Mrs. Morrison
Julie Austin
Bride's Father
Bride's Father
Alex Norton
Smythe
Smythe
Michael Byrne
Corporal
Corporal
William Scott-Masson
Madbaker / Flagman
Madbaker / Flagman
Dean Lopata
Stewart
Stewart
Donal Gibson
Faudron
Faudron
Jimmy Chisholm
Lochlan
Lochlan
John Murtagh
Young soldier
Young soldier
David McKay
English General
English General
Niall O'Brien
Drinker #1
Drinker #1
Martin Dempsey
Drinker #2
Drinker #2
Jimmy Keogh
Chief Assassin
Chief Assassin
Joe Savino
Jailor
Jailor
Mal Whyte
English Commander
English Commander
Paul Tucker
Doogal (uncredited)
Doogal (uncredited)
Graeme Ford
Warrior #2 (uncredited)
Warrior #2 (uncredited)
Greg Jeloudov
Lady at Wedding (uncredited)
Lady at Wedding (uncredited)
Rana Morrison
English General (uncredited)
English General (uncredited)
Jer O'Leary
Toothless Girl
Toothless Girl
Joanne Bett
Priest No. 2
Priest No. 2
Robert Paterson
Lord Dolecroft
Lord Dolecroft
Martin Dunne
Leper's Caretaker
Leper's Caretaker
Fred Chiverton
York Captain
York Captain
Daniel Coll
Villager
Villager
Bill Murdoch
Farmer
Farmer
Phil Kelly

Reviews

  • Anton2k

    Being Scottish, this movie really does a good job at showing off the scenery in and around Scotland. The story line of this movie keeps you on the edge of your seat all the way through the movie. Mel Gibson does a really good job with the accent and plays a great role as William Wallace in the movie. I cant help by want to stand up and shout FREEDOM! once the movie is finished. Could watched this movie another 1000 times and not get board of watching it. It's a must watch for any one who has not see it yet.

  • John Chard

    Historical flaws aside, Braveheart is a rousing spectacle. So it comes to pass in the year of 1995 (not a year of our lord I think) that Mel Gibson would craft the award winning epic that is Braveheart, a film that is historically bent in the extreme, that is directed by a man who would go on to have a less than favourable character reputation, and a film that has a heavy handed approach at times. It's also as choppy as a boat ride during a tidal wave, so yes, Braveheart is far from flawless folks. Yet the structure, the epic emotional swirls and sheer spectacle of it all marks it out as a rousing treat. It's a lavish gargantuan epic that somehow seems out of place for the year it was made, perhaps the secret of the films' success is because the 90s were crying out for an epic to get us hankering back to those halcyon days of Spartacus et al. Or just maybe the film punched the buttons of the public psyche because it is a great and grand thing to see the little people rise up and kick some ass? The oppressed and the bullied strike back as it were, surely that theme works for the normal human being? It's a sweeping tale that involves love, loyalty, honour, dishonour, treachery, death & heroes and villains. In short it ticks all the boxes for the genre it sits in (clinical bloody battles superbly full on). Gibson is William Wallace, and although he may struggle to nail the Scottish accent to fully convince at times, he more than makes up for it with his verve and vigour when delivering his lines - with the Sons Of Scotland speech at Stirling a particular iconic highlight. Patrick McGoohan is pure egotistical villainy as Longshanks, King Edward I, and the supporting cast also do sterling work (or should that be Stirling?). Brendan Gleeson, Tommy Flanagan, Catherine McCormack, Angus Macfadyen, and the wonderful James Cosmo all add flavour to the delightful scotch broth on the screen. The score by James Horner is appropriately tight to the themes at work in the piece, and the cinematography by John Toll was rightly awarded at Oscar time since he captured the essence of the film. Be it the lush rolling hills or the blood stained field in the aftermath of battle, Toll's work is critically in sync with the unfolding mood of the picture. So yes, damn straight, flaws and all, pic has the ability to lift and inspire many a discerning viewer. It does kick you at times, but as it does so, it also emotionally engages you from start to finish - to which the film deserves every accolade and award that it won. Because the grandiose epic had seemed long gone, but Gibson and his army brought it back to the modern era and made a genre piece fit to hold it's head up high with the greats of years gone by. 10/10